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1098cc engine- HELP! HELP! Is this normal?

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danny01453 Danny O'Malley
Leominster, MA, USA   USA
Hi, I was just doing a little preventative maintenance on my 1971 Traveler and thought I'd change the valve cover gasket and the side cover gaskets that were dripping oil (surprise). Took my time, got them off, cleaned them, put the new gaskets on the side covers and had a heck of a job lining the side covers up to get the bolt back in. Could have used a second hand to hold them while I fished for the bolt hole. Anyway, after 20 min. I got the back one in and all set. The front one, so I thought would be less of a challenge. I played with that for 5 min. then I got a small stubby screwdriver to align the bolt and hole. I placed the screwdriver in the hole and all my antifreeze came pouring out, onto the ground and into the cavity with the lifters and eventually into the oil pan. What the heck is that?
Working on some American cars, I have taken out head or manifold bolts that were in the water jacket with the antifreeze.
IS THIS NORMAL FOR MY CAR? I am panicking, it doesn't seem to make much sense that if it is in the water jacket that it would be designed to go into the crankcase. Please help so I can get some sleep tonight.
Thanks
Danny

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emjay Jim English
Marietta, PA, USA   USA
It should be a blind hole since it is a machine thread bolt with no sealing capabilities, I'd say you have a problem with that block. It may have rusted from the inside. Have you confirmed the leak is through the threaded hole or somewhere else.

66jalopy Avatar
66jalopy Silver Member Phillip Jolliffe
Lake City, FL, USA   USA
As Emjay mentioned, it should be a blind hole. Rust, someone forcing a too log bolt in years ago or something like that. Maybe the last guy put some sealer on the bolt and you pushed through it with your screwdriver. As long as that is all it is I would probably do something like screwing a stud with some JB weld in the block and attach the cover with a nut.

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danny01453 Danny O'Malley
Leominster, MA, USA   USA
Thank you for the replies. Yes no doubt it was pouring out of that bolt hole. I have had it for 3 years and no issue with water contamination nor oil. The oil has always been very clean, the antifreeze/radiator are clean (no rust/deposits), doesn't use oil or overheat, compression is 105 x (3) and 90 x (1). Today I used the Permatex high heat thread goop and let it run for 45 min. then took it out for a spin and nothing in the oil and no more cover leaks either. Seems like you may be right and somehow the bolt went into the jacket and they must have fixed it in a similar fashion, that is until I poked it?

0123 Mike D
Biddulph, Staffs, UK   GBR
I've never met a Morris Minor where
the rocker cover is held on by bolts.

66jalopy Avatar
66jalopy Silver Member Phillip Jolliffe
Lake City, FL, USA   USA
You didn't read it right, it was the two side covers.

0123 Mike D
Biddulph, Staffs, UK   GBR
Thanks Phil yawning smiley)

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pgp001 Phil Procter
Silsden, West Yorkshire, UK   GBR
I am just about to change the front side cover on my engine, it currently has the convex type with an open breather pipe on it and I am changing it to the later concave one with the breather oil trap connection to the carburettor. This is in the hope it will reduce oil loss from the back of the engine.

My question is:-
What size bolt do I need for a concave cover, and are there any sealing washers etc required, I already know I need a rubber type gasket instead of the cork one, but the parts lists I have available don't show these covers and fixings.

Has anyone else done this modification with any success at slowing oil leaks down.

Thanks
Phil

0123 Mike D
Biddulph, Staffs, UK   GBR
Gerard sells the only 100% solution I know of.
pixelsmith@gerardsgarage.com

I drilled a hole in the filter box
between the filter and the carb.

I connected that hole to the
breather in the rocker box

It reduced oil loss a fair bit.

Is this the seal for which you look

http://www.morrisminorspares.com/engine-c14/ohv-engine-c16/seal-side-cover-bolt-concave-type-p830172

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emjay Jim English
Marietta, PA, USA   USA
Basically, you are talking about putting a 1098 side cover on a 948 to go from the open draught tube to one with an oil trap and connecting it to the intake at some point. Someone mentioned not too long ago that the later covers require a different gasket than the earlier ones so make sure you have the right one as you stated. Where are your oil leaks? All can be addressed with engine in place except the rear main seal.

pgp001 Phil Procter
Silsden, West Yorkshire, UK   GBR
That ESM bolt seal looks like it might be the one thanks.

The oil is dripping from the back of the engine after a run, so I assume it is the scroll seal being pressurised and allowing oil past. I already have a 1098 not a 948, the late cover is like a mini one with the chimney pot stuck out on the side of it.
I have just rebuilt a HS2 carb with the breather connection into the venturi and am going to give it a try soon.

Phil

0123 Mike D
Biddulph, Staffs, UK   GBR
Loose sump bolts, poor sump seals are a common cause.

Especially the square cork sump seals at the ends.

I soak the square seals in water for up to a week.
Then put them inside a Gaffer tape roll to shape them.

I cut them off a fraction longer than the book says to get a snug fit.

0123 Mike D
Biddulph, Staffs, UK   GBR
There are some strong reasons against
sucking too much air in from the c/case.

Oil fumes burn, but they have a low octane rating.
Which means a less power from your engine.

The oil leaves muck on your valves.

Warm air induced into the mixture expands it,
which means your engine doesn't breath very well.

Modern cars restrict the flow of air from the c/case.

A catchpot in the breather circuit will offset most of
the the nuisance associated with crankcase breathers.
About a tenner on eBay,



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-05-05 01:07 AM by 0123.

pixelsmithusa Avatar
If you are going to run the late style 1098 covers with the canister, it will actually do less for you than the draught tube unless you plumb it with the Smith's PCV valve off the manifold. That's how it was intended to work. Venting to atmosphere won't contribute to minimizing the leak from the scroll seal. Chances are, it'll still leak at shut down, but maybe not as much if you are successful with the Smith's PCV







Gerard

http://gerardsgarage.com/

pgp001 Phil Procter
Silsden, West Yorkshire, UK   GBR
Hi Gerard

Not sure what you mean by venting to atmosphere in this case, I was actually planning on connecting the canister to the side of the SU carburettor to get negative pressure to the crankcase.
As far as I understand that's how the very latest UK Minors and Mini's of the same era were set up for breathing, I have been told that the PCV valve was used on export models.

I might have misunderstood what you meant.

Phil

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