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morris minor jack

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kei Kei V
Auckland, Northland, New Zealand   NZL
Hello,
Does anyone own and use when necessary an early type jack. The jack I mean consists of a threaded pole and fits under the body behind each wheel. The parts where the jack are fitted are reinforced. My jack does not have the turning lever to make it move up and down, so the other question is, what length is this lever? The lever fits into a hole at the bottom of the jack. Is this lever operated with one or two hands? If it is with one hand, then it must have a stopper at the end of the lever to prevent it from being pulled out.
Thanks for your replies.

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bufferzone Avatar
bufferzone Gord Smith-Ritchie
Surfside Colony, CA, USA   USA
I found this site that might help you. UK made jacks and Oz too.

http://www.classic-british-car-jacks.uk/Car%20Maker%20Branded%20Jacks.htm#Morris_Jacks

0123 Mike D
Biddulph, Staffs, UK   GBR
Please would you kindly post a picture of your jacK smiling smiley

In reply to # 34395 by kei Hello,
Does anyone own and use when necessary an early type jack. The jack I mean consists of a threaded pole and fits under the body behind each wheel. The parts where the jack are fitted are reinforced. My jack does not have the turning lever to make it move up and down, so the other question is, what length is this lever? The lever fits into a hole at the bottom of the jack. Is this lever operated with one or two hands? Two minimum, three better If it is with one hand, then it must have a stopper at the end of the lever to prevent it from being pulled out.
Thanks for your replies.

Here's the Brit version

It fits under the B-Post.
Back edge of the front door.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 2019-01-26 03:15 PM by 0123.

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emjay Jim English
Etters, PA, USA   USA
The illustration in the manual appears to be a plain bar. Probably the tommy bar in the tool kit that also was used with the spark plug socket. The tommy bar in the later cars does have an enlarged end on one end. The illustration shows equal length on both sides of the jack, but you would have the option of sliding it to one end to increase your leverage, which you will need. I hope you are planning on using the jack, a bit dangerous.

kiwiminor Ray Willis
Prince Albert, SK, Canada   CAN
Kei,
The illustration Mike provided shows the jack for the mid-car mounting. The 'crooked' bar is used to turn the hex at the top, and is also used as a crank-handle with the two pins at the other end slotting into the front-pulley.
Kia Ora,
Ray W

kei Kei V
Auckland, Northland, New Zealand   NZL
Thanks,
The triangular jack was used for the Minors after 1957 and fitted into two jack-mounts on either side of the car underneath the front doors. By using this jack, both wheels on one side of the car are lifted off the ground. For Minors built before '57 a simpler jack was used, which can be seen on the website provided by Gord.
The picture does not show the lever, which can be lost easily. It seems to me, that by using both hands, more power can be exerted, so if nobody has this lever, I will go for a straight bar without a knob on the end.
The older jack fitted behind each wheel, so four jacking points. Each point lifts up only one wheel, so I am not sure, if it has detrimental effects upon the structural strength of the body.
Each jacking point is reinforced. These reinforcements are probably absent on cars after '57. The earlier cars had smaller wheels with 7 inch drums, whereas the later models had eight inch drums.
In that case, the earlier jacks may not fit on cars built after fifty-seven.
The manual does mention putting blocks in front and behind the wheels for safety.

0123 Mike D
Biddulph, Staffs, UK   GBR
In reply to # 34411 by kei Thanks,
The triangular jack was used for the Minors after 1957 and fitted into two jack-mounts on either side of the car underneath the front doors. By using this jack, both wheels on one side of the car are lifted off the ground. For Minors built before '57 a simpler jack was used, which can be seen on the website provided by Gord.
The picture does not show the lever, which can be lost easily. It seems to me, that by using both hands, more power can be exerted, so if nobody has this lever, I will go for a straight bar without a knob on the end.
The older jack fitted behind each wheel, Our Gord's jack is a bumper jack
so four jacking points. Our Gord's jack hooks under the bumper, no jacking points needed.. Each point lifts up only one wheel, so I am not sure, if it has detrimental effects upon the structural strength of the body.
Each jacking point is reinforced. These reinforcements are probably absent on cars after '57. The earlier cars had smaller wheels with 7 inch drums, whereas the later models had eight inch drums.
In that case, the earlier jacks may not fit on cars built after fifty-seven.
The manual does mention putting blocks in front and behind the wheels for safety. Most on us used van type jacks instead winking smiley
I suspect Antipodean cars were different from ours.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-01-26 03:39 PM by 0123.


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emjay Jim English
Etters, PA, USA   USA
Mike, it's not a bumper jack. This subject had come up before. The earlier cars used a threaded rod as shown in the earlier posts that you would put in under the fender and clip into the jacking point. Remnants of the front one resulted in the two wing bolts at the bottom. Once the jack was in place, the operator had to knell very low or get on the ground to rotate the jack. One would have to be very good at the placement on the ground to maintain a somewhat safe arrangement as the car was raised and all the time the operator is rotating the jack all the way at the bottom.

plumby Avatar
plumby Phil P
Surrey Hills, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia   AUS
The tommy-bar provided in the original tool kit is 6" long and 0.3 inch (1/4inch?) in diameter, and had a domed head at one end.

It was used to - very slowly - turn the screw-thread of the original jack, which hooked under the body as previously described.

I suggest that even raising one wheel by that method would be slow, <risky to the person>, and quite hard given the limited access inside the front wing, or at the rear reinforced lifting-point. No wonder the Factory was forced to improve on that arrangement, but after quite a few years of production!



Phil Plumbe
Surrey Hills, Melbourne, Australia

0123 Mike D
Biddulph, Staffs, UK   GBR
You could be correct Jim smiling smiley

On the opther hand,
the chap who runs Gord's site
could be correct,

Custom and practice
called it a bumper jack.

Would anyone in their right mind
try to use it as shown in the pics?


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0123 Mike D
Biddulph, Staffs, UK   GBR
Used as a bumper jack,
it is easier to get to it,

Also, it's lifting less weight.
as a 2nd order lever.

At a guess, about half the weight
compared with the behind the wheel idea.

Used behind the wheel,
it's a 3rd order lever.

2nd order levers, wheel barrows
work with you,
decrease effort

3rd order levers, tweezers
work against you,
increase effort.

The back axle is the fulcrum
when you lift a front wheel.
Vicky versa at the back winking smiley



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-01-27 02:19 AM by 0123.


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emjay Jim English
Etters, PA, USA   USA
But the rod's length was sized to fit inside the wings with a flat tyre yet long enough to unload the suspension and lift the wheel. Placing it under the bumper starts out higher and due to the better leverage more travel is needed so one would run out of jack before the tyre would be off the ground. You.d have to carry a block to place it on as well as well blocks. I wonder how many wings were damaged as the car shifted driving the threaded rod outward. When the designers established the length, I wonder how much variation in terrain was considered. If the wheel was in a bit of a hole, could the jack have been used? Would it have been long enough if place under the bumper?

0123 Mike D
Biddulph, Staffs, UK   GBR
Hey, come on Jim yawning smiley)

One drives one's flattie
up onto the block thumbs up

kei Kei V
Auckland, Northland, New Zealand   NZL
Thanks Phil,
That is just what I was looking for.
I will have one made up.

tappetTwo pete kd
hillview, nsw, Australia   AUS
my car, when finished, will have the original jack in the boot,
but supplemented with a standard bottle jack, a lump of 6x2x10 inches as a base pad.
its nice to have and show original equipment, but safety is more important than show, so that's it for me.winking smiley

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