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1275 Swap

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doxendine Donnie Oxendine
Huntingburg, IN, USA   USA
As the title states I'm swapping into my 58 Morris a 1275 with rib case gear box. I'm not sure what fan and pulley will fit without getting into the radiator. Can anyone help?

Thanks

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0123 Mike D
Biddulph, Staffs, UK   GBR
If it's a 1275 A-Series engine
the fan and pulley fit.

An electric rad fan is
worth thinking about.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-12-17 01:27 AM by 0123.

0123 Mike D
Biddulph, Staffs, UK   GBR
With your summer temps
perhaps twin fans thumbs up

Especially if you wire one
to run on after shut down thumbs up

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emjay Jim English
Etters, PA, USA   USA
The issue with a 1275 and fan is the crankcase ventilation canister on the timing chain cover and the direction top radiator hose on the thermostat cover. An electric fan is an option. I used a Spridget metal fan with the shorter blades and slightly reformed the inner blade. A small spacer behind the blade should work as well. Up top a stock 948 Minor thermostat cover gets the direction close but the hose will be strained. Trying different hoses is an option. A MGA and certain MGB covers have the exit direction right but the hose diameter is next size up.

doxendine Donnie Oxendine
Huntingburg, IN, USA   USA
That's kinda what I was thinking when looking at the timing chain cover and the canister sticking out. How about swapping timing chain covers from the 948? Will it bolt to the 1275?

shoebone Stuart F
tempe, AZ, USA   USA
This link gives you the thermostat housing, not cheap but your hose will love you !! http://www.jagspares.co.uk/Morris/partdetail.asp?partno=12M220

Highland Park, IL, USA   USA
In reply to # 33908 by shoebone This link gives you the thermostat housing, not cheap but your hose will love you !! http://www.jagspares.co.uk/Morris/partdetail.asp?partno=12M220

Stuart F,

I am accomplishing the same 1275 conversion on my '57 convertible.

This David Manners Group (DMG) thermostat housing . . . it is a bit pricey for what it is.

Is that because it is a custom part?

Or, is this something one could find on some other BMC/BLMC/RG parts car?

If I have to get it from DMG, I will. But if it is available in the used car market, I'll keep my eyes open for a while.

Thanks.

Ken

Highland Park, IL, USA   USA
Found a previous thread which talks about this:

https://www.morrisminorforum.com/phorum/read.php?2,5983



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-12-17 10:22 AM by PracticalProgram.

emjay Jim English
Etters, PA, USA   USA
The plain timing chain cover fits BUT there is no good way to vent the crankcase since the tappets no longer have covers on the 1275. There are those who have cut the canister in half the long way and soldered on a flat cover giving loads of clearance.

0123 Mike D
Biddulph, Staffs, UK   GBR
What's wrong with venting through the rocker box please Jim smiling smiley

emjay Jim English
Etters, PA, USA   USA
You need inlet and outlet for venting. Depending on what the engine has it may or may not work. Originally the rocker was for incoming air. If he has an old metal oil fill, it would just pull air in the cap assuming the hose is connected to vacuum but then it will affect the mixture, so some controls are needed.

0123 Mike D
Biddulph, Staffs, UK   GBR
Yeah, a lot of variables Jim yawning smiley)

To my mind,
a modern PCV valve between the rocker box, and manifold
along with an open pipe from chamber between filter and carb
will do the business.

After all, it's supposed to be positive crankcase ventilation,
to my mind, that means the other end of the vent pipes
should be below crankcase pressure.

emjay Jim English
Etters, PA, USA   USA
Note, that the concept is to prevent any positive pressure in the crank case which can be explosive. Those who use it to control oil leaks are actually on the other side of the coin. They are successful because by eliminating the pressure, the engine is now not PUSHING the oil out any hole it can find. The ventilation is not designed to PULL the oil back in, just to eliminate a positive pressure.

0123 Mike D
Biddulph, Staffs, UK   GBR
I think crankcase ventilation
is a fair bit more complex than that Jim.

Before WW2 c/case ventilation was achieved
through a tube that poked into the slipstream.

Somebody's effect sucked the fumes out
when the car was moving.
Bernouilli's was it anyone?

Anyhow, that system went down the Swanee
when they found that engines were sucking
water into themselves during fording.

Instant solution: -

Part 1
Connect the c/case vent pipe to the air intake
so the engine did an oozelem bird and exited
it's c/case gases through it's anal orifice.
Part 2
Let "fresh" air into the engine through
a modified oil filler cap.
An oil filler cap with a gauze filter
to keep the muck out the engine.

In new engines, the system ran at or near,
the slightly below atmospheric pressure
caused by resistance in the air filter.

Since the original idea was to protect
engines during fording, air filter resistance
had to me monitored to so that the pressure
in the crankcase was never low enough
to suck water in.

Somewhere along the line probably during the War,
folks realised that the flow of fresh air
through the engine stopped mayo build up.

By '44, induction on Go-Devil engines in jeeps,
sucked combustion gases from the c/case both
into the pipe between carb. and filter, and through
an MGA / MGB type pressure differential operated
valve into the inlet manifold.
When the jeep was climbing a bank, or running a generator
the manifold sucked little or no air from the c/case.
Instead, the slightly lower pressure behind the filter
sucked c/case gases out of the c/case.
A win-win situation?

The pic shows air flow through a Go-Devil engine.

Air only flows from high pressure to low pressure.
Ergo, the pressure behind the air filter is lower
than the atmospheric pressure, since the c/case
has on open connection to behind the filter,
the crankcase pressure is below atmospheric P.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-12-19 02:49 AM by 0123.


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doxendine Donnie Oxendine
Huntingburg, IN, USA   USA
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