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Considering Restoring a Morris Minor.. Pros & Cons?

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bstogsdill Avatar
bstogsdill Bradley Stogsdill
Greenbrier, Arkansas!, USA   USA
Hi

I am wrapping up a restoration project on a 1970 Spitfire and I am considering a Morris Minor for my next project... can anyone tell me pros and cons of choosing a Morris Minor to restore?

It appears it would be a similar project as the spitfire as it is a small and relatively inexpensive vehicle and have good parts availability as it seems to have been a lot of them made. Also I remember my dad having one for a while when i was 10 or 12 years old. I think they are cool looking cars. I could restore one keeping the original engine and drive train and enjoy it as original ,or if i found one without an engine I could substitute an alternate drive train and have fun with that as well. The car is beautiful in its original form and also looks good with modifications.

I do want to avoid attempting to restore something uncommon with hard to find parts or expensive.

Regards
Bradley

bstogsdill Avatar
bstogsdill Bradley Stogsdill
Greenbrier, Arkansas!, USA   USA
Leaping lizards... no one has any opinion?
Am I on an abandoned forum? That would be my luck..

2nd MM Panel Silver Member Phill Dallas
Nevada City, California, USA   USA
1959 Morris Minor 1000 Van "Mycroft"
Pros: Good looking and lends itself to well considered custom body work.
Pleasant but uninspired performance in stock configurations. Many documented driveline upgrades from rotary to V8.
Parts are, for the most part, readily available and easily repaired or replaced.

Cons: Can't think of any.

Like all LBCs they are hobbies disguised as automobiles. If you're good with that you'll love it.
All that said, look for rust in the undercarriage and lower points on the body panels. And if it's a Traveler, inspect the wood VERY closely. Repairing chassis rust or rotten wood can get seriously expensive.

tjt77 timothy Trevithick
Grass Valley, California, USA   USA
pros:- everything is available and none of it will break the bank.. most of the outer body panels are bolt on.. there are a good number of bolt in mechanical upgrades from later BMC cars that used the same (A series) size powertrains.. the stronger mechanicals from a post '66 sprite/midget are easy to obtain.. the cars are very simple and can be rebuilt with little more than standard hand tools.. you have plenty of space under the hood should you desire to use alternative engines/trans.. the cars were initially designed to take a 'flat four', or horizontally opposed engine. so something such as a Honda gullwing motorcycle engine is a possibility.

cons:- be aware of rust.. pay close attention to front chassis rails and the outer parts of the longditudinal sill sections under the car on the pouter edges...as well as the rearmost part fo trunk floor... avoid any inclement climate cars, especially UK RHD examples ( almost all of which will have been patched to varying degrees and and standards) those from NZ or south africa fare much better.. BUT.. there were thousands imported in US spec from '51 through 61.. then a break till 67.. then no more.. rear axles are marginal as regards ability to take more powerful engine..but stronger axle shafts are avail out of UK.. sourcing the most sound, rust free car you can find will save you big time in the long run..( plenty of structurally sound dead projects remain on west coast) good luck.

bstogsdill Avatar
bstogsdill Bradley Stogsdill
Greenbrier, Arkansas!, USA   USA
Thank you guys for the replies. I think the car would be a great choice for me. Perhaps within the next 6 months or so I may get my hands on one... will keep you all updated.
regards
Bradley

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